“Am I talking to an exhibition?”

ARTIST’S NOTEBOOK
Week 4, Thursday

I’m thinking about how being present with the work adds to the art experience when people visit. I’m thinking about what reliance on ‘wall text’ removes from the dynamic in an art gallery. So far, we have no wall text describing the work. This exhibition is one in which people sit on the floor and chat, quite naturally and without being asked. It’s not one where they circle the gallery and read the walls. Every day is different.

Using the space, the art, in process, connecting with collaborators not physically here.

One of the first things I find myself saying when people walk into the laboratory is “feel free to ask us questions!”

And if they look a bit uncertain about what they are looking at, I explain how dialogue is part of this process and we are interested in their impressions and responses too.

Yes, their impressions are more important to me than whether they ‘understand my work’. What I think I’m trying to say can change day by day, such is an artists life – this artist’s life? – I want to know what they see and think and there starts the conversation, there emerges the excitement of a meeting of minds (worlds).

Two students, came together, Sun and Hailee. I told them about Rapunzle when they asked, and the time she shaved her hair off.

“This exhibition makes me feel like I’m in a fairytale.” – Hailee

Sun noticed that I’d left a needle hanging from the bottom of the basket and how it seemed to create a connection with the lilypad underneath.

Kimvi interprets my work through re-arranging it (Tuesday)

He told me about the Chinese legend of the Monkey King, whose mother put him in the middle of a Lotus and floated him down a river and he was adopted by The Goddess of Mercy.

(I think Sun is looking the name up on his phone in the above photograph as he later showed me the Chinese – English translations.)

Right after this picture was taken, our second visitor arrived. Hello, hello!
“Am I talking to an exhibition?” he said

Today’s thoughts
on why dialogic process is important to me.

A peek at my WhatsApp chat.

Digesting‘, Thursday, Whats App Words with Sarah Misselbrook

When the artwork is invisible, happening in the dialogue in ‘the space between’ how do you share it?

By writing about it and talking about it I suppose.
But most importantly by demonstrating it.
No, by being it.

The lived experience of art in action…

Maybe it remains a private thing, until the seeds of a dialogue spout and take root in our lives. There is the creativity I am most interested in.

Published by Maija Liepins

Australian born, mixed-media artist, Maija Liepins focuses on the sensory and emotional experience in her visual dreamscapes. Repetitive actions such as dream journals or collecting visual impressions with her mobile phone generates material with which to reveal the subtle, ‘underneath’. Maija’s drawings and films allude to a symbolic mythology as if the intangible substance of dream is a material as real as ink and clay. Her practice is driven by a pursuit of freedom - to express, to create, and to collaborate without inculturated inhibition.