Invisible Barriers

Although our responses may be unplanned, my visits to WSA have already started threads growing and weaving in my mind, like determined tendrils with a life of their own.

Ahead of my time on site in November, the glass of the windowed architecture and the surfaces of the Rotunda moat and nearby river, link with my existing interests in going Beyond The Binary, and exploring the relationship between my body and bodies of water.

Reflections, invisible barriers, exclusion and queerness all merge and inform what I start to notice, and what I look for in the local environment at Winchester, as well as what my noticings tell me about my self.

5 comments on “Invisible Barriers”

  1. Beautifully evocative combo of photographs!

    Tendrils of thought in the water …

    I thought of you when I was at the Unearthing Landscapes symposium in Farnham today. There was work by http://www.Lizkmiller.com/blog there and the accompanying text included the line “Her interest is in Green Water, the moisture that cycles through plants, and this installation highlights the complexity and fragility of these essential ecosystems”. The project was Forest Listening

  2. Thank you Maija, its exciting to feel the work building and bubbling already.

    It’s good to hear more about Unearthing Landscapes, I’ll read up about Liz’s work, I went to college in Farnham and spent a lot of time walking, writing and making in the area, so would have really enjoyed today I’m sure.

  3. the water that flows at WSA has taken thousands of years to filter through the chalk cliffs, it has a high purity, yet it cannot remove the ghosts of where it has already been, what has it witnessed in the locations it passed, the shadows of yourself are in a different time and space.

    1. Have you looked into ‘living’ water and ‘dead’ water Andy? I understand it as a concept but don’t know much about it. It relates to the structure of the water and what can alter the structure of water.

    2. Thanks Andy, yes – filtered through the fossilised bodies of prehistoric microorganisms! And of course now all water has microplastics in it too… reminding us there are no divisions, no inside/outside, natural/man-made.

Leave a Reply to James Aldridge

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *